A Body Without Organs

Daniel. Philosophy. Mathematics. Physics. Logic. Reason. Art. Nature. Abstractions. Epic Fantasy. Self-Expression. Guitar. Musical Composition. Enigmas. Spirituality. Sobriety. Isolation. Misanthropic. Vegan. Pensive. Introspection. Positive Energy. Growth. Progression. Change. Question Everything. I love to read.

(Source: sedgewhisker, via drjammz)

mrrobotico:

This X1000

mrrobotico:

This X1000

(via cafe-chico)

fffcuk:

what doesn’t kill you fucks you up mentally and affects your ability to have stable relationships with other human beings

(via drjammz)

Lmao

Lmao

antongun:

Good morning world. #kvlt #suckaunicorn #unicorn #bj

antongun:

Good morning world. #kvlt #suckaunicorn #unicorn #bj

wildcat2030:

The dark side of the universe is whispering, but scientists are still not sure what it is saying.
Samuel Ting, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Nobel laureate particle physicist, said Wednesday that his $1.6 billion cosmic ray experiment on the International Space Station had found evidence of “new physical phenomena” that could represent dark matter, the mysterious stuff that serves as the gravitational foundation for galaxies and whose identification would rewrite some of the laws of physics.
The results, he said, confirmed previous reports that local interstellar space is crackling with an unexplained abundance of high energy particles, especially positrons, the antimatter version of the familiar electrons that comprise electricity and chemistry. They could be colliding particles of dark matter. Or they could be could be coming from previously undiscovered pulsars or other astronomical monsters, throwing off wild winds of radiation.
The tantalizing news is that even with the new data, physicists cannot tell yet which is the right answer, but they are encouraged that they soon might be able to. (via Tantalizing New Clues Into the Mysteries of Dark Matter - NYTimes.com)

wildcat2030:

The dark side of the universe is whispering, but scientists are still not sure what it is saying.

Samuel Ting, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Nobel laureate particle physicist, said Wednesday that his $1.6 billion cosmic ray experiment on the International Space Station had found evidence of “new physical phenomena” that could represent dark matter, the mysterious stuff that serves as the gravitational foundation for galaxies and whose identification would rewrite some of the laws of physics.

The results, he said, confirmed previous reports that local interstellar space is crackling with an unexplained abundance of high energy particles, especially positrons, the antimatter version of the familiar electrons that comprise electricity and chemistry. They could be colliding particles of dark matter. Or they could be could be coming from previously undiscovered pulsars or other astronomical monsters, throwing off wild winds of radiation.

The tantalizing news is that even with the new data, physicists cannot tell yet which is the right answer, but they are encouraged that they soon might be able to. (via Tantalizing New Clues Into the Mysteries of Dark Matter - NYTimes.com)

“Organisms have to be understood as a mesh of virtual selves. I don’t have one identity, I have a bricolage of various identities. I have a cellular identity, I have an immune identity, I have a cognitive identity, I have various identities that manifest in different modes of interaction. These are my various selves. I’m interested in gaining further insight into how to clarify this notion of transition from the local to the global, and how these various selves come together and apart in the evolutionary dance.”

—   

Varela

Edge: THE EMERGENT SELF

(via wildcat2030)

(via wildcat2030)

“This is a logical bootstrap, a loop: a network produces entities that create a boundary, which constrains the network that produced the boundary. This bootstrap is precisely what’s unique about cells. A self-distinguishing entity exists when the bootstrap is completed. This entity has produced its own boundary. It doesn’t require an external agent to notice it, or to say, “I’m here.” It is, by itself, a self- distinction. It bootstraps itself out of a soup of chemistry and physics.”

A picture of Ken of Abigail Williams, and myself.